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Azure, C#, .NET, Architecture & Related Tech News


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Distributed Design: Applying the Command Pattern to Azure’s Web/Worker Roles

WorkerRoleOne place I regularly come across the use of the Command pattern is when working on Azure projects that employ worker roles to execute long running tasks initiated by a scheduled process or user action. The Command pattern lends itself to the distributed nature of these solutions with very little plumbing required when working in Azure.

The following post provides a sample application; CommandQueue which contains 3 examples of a web and worker role utilising the Command pattern. The web role is designed to provide a rapid responses to the user, offloading any lengthy operations to the worker role. The source code for the CommandQueue solution is available on GitHub so feel free to clone, compile and execute it while working through this post.

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Adding a Local Git Repository to GitHub: Step-By-Step Guide

GitHubEveryone loves GitHub, and if they don’t it’s only because they haven’t started using it yet ūüėČ

So what do you do if you have a local Git repository and you want to push it up to GitHub to share it with the greater public, or use it as a collaboration point with a number of other developers without spending any money? Well that’s where GitHub comes in, it’s a “web-based hosting service¬†for software development projects that use the¬†Git¬†revision control¬†system.”¬†– Wikipedia. GitHub sports a number of features but we’re only going to be focusing on it’s ability to house a public repository in this post.

If you do want to be wowed by the scale a large-scale project supported by GitHub do check out this visualisation of the Ruby community on GitHub or browse through the Ruby code from their GitHub page.
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Getting Started with Git and Visual Studio: Step-By-Step Guide

Git This post provides a visual¬†step-by-step guide to installing Git on a Windows machine and integrating it into Visual Studio. By the end of this guide you’ll be able to use Git as a source code management (SCM) system for all of your Visual Studio projects, and hopefully start to appreciate why Git has become such a huge success.

For those not so familiar with Git it’s a free and open-source¬†Distributed Version Control System (DVCS) developed back in 2005 by a very famous developer in the software world named¬†Linus Torvalds. It’s considered “the SCM” of choice in many circles and for good reason. It’s fast, simple, distributed, can support projects of any size and a variety of workflows. If you want to read more visit the Git Book website – it’s a free online resource for learning about Git. Continue reading