Bernie Cook's Blog

Azure, C#, .NET, Architecture & Related Tech News


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Distributed Caching in Azure – Cache Worker Role

In June 2012 version 1.7 of the Windows Azure Platform release was introduced and with it came the new cache worker role. This provided another distributed cache management option for Azure developers alongside the likes of AppFabric Caching, or Memcached, to name a few. There are a number of ways to utilise and configure cache worker roles and this post covers one of them, providing a step by step guide to creating a new cloud solution where a web and worker role (cache clients) share the same cache worker role (cache cluster). Continue reading


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Book Review: “Professional ASP.NET MVC 4”

Professional ASP.NET MVC 4A few months after the official release of MVC 4 I decided to go hunting for an MVC 4 book that was less of an introduction to MVC 4 and written more for the seasoned MVC developer. I’d recently delivered an MVC 3 solution so was looking to work my way through a MVC 4 book that was (a) written by some respected authors, (b)  would provide a comprehensive guide to the latest iteration of this particular framework, (c) draw attention to those features new to version 4, and (d) provide a structure that easily permitted me to skim over the more familiar concepts.

So I did some research and ended up purchasing Wrox’s Professional ASP.NET MVC 4 by Jon Galloway, Phil Haack, Brad Wilson and K. Scott Allen. Having recently finished it I thought I’d share a review for the benefit of those who are in a similar situation to myself several months ago. Continue reading


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Async in Windows Azure

At the time of writing (November 2012) Windows Azure C# development is only available with the .NET 3.5 and 4.0 Frameworks. So what happens when you want to implement some asynchronous server-based programming using the .NET 5.0 Async language features?

Microsoft’s answer is to install the Async Targeting Pack for Visual Studio 2012. The only prerequisite is that you’re developing with Visual Studio 2012. Continue reading