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Azure, C#, .NET, Architecture & Related Tech News


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Put ReSharper In Your Toolbox

ReSharperReSharper, the productivity tool which extends the Visual Studio IDE, is one development tool that I would certainly not want to live without. It’s one thing to have a strong skill set and another to compliment it with a great set of tools.

I’d seen ReSharper in action a number of times back in early 2012 but was never sold on it – I mean Visual Studio is an amazingly rich IDE, how could you ever hope to make it better? Well JetBrains (the minds behind ReSharper) have done just that. ReSharper is designed as an extension to Visual Studio providing an array of productivity benefits for both teams and individual developers.

I’m conscious that by now I’m starting to sound like a salesman, but do bear with me. What I’ve done is bundle together a few ReSharper features in this post. Hopefully it’s enough of a introduction to convince you of it’s necessary place in your toolbox. Continue reading


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Adding a Local Git Repository to GitHub: Step-By-Step Guide

GitHubEveryone loves GitHub, and if they don’t it’s only because they haven’t started using it yet ūüėČ

So what do you do if you have a local Git repository and you want to push it up to GitHub to share it with the greater public, or use it as a collaboration point with a number of other developers without spending any money? Well that’s where GitHub comes in, it’s a “web-based hosting service¬†for software development projects that use the¬†Git¬†revision control¬†system.”¬†– Wikipedia. GitHub sports a number of features but we’re only going to be focusing on it’s ability to house a public repository in this post.

If you do want to be wowed by the scale a large-scale project supported by GitHub do check out this visualisation of the Ruby community on GitHub or browse through the Ruby code from their GitHub page.
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Getting Started with Git and Visual Studio: Step-By-Step Guide

Git This post provides a visual¬†step-by-step guide to installing Git on a Windows machine and integrating it into Visual Studio. By the end of this guide you’ll be able to use Git as a source code management (SCM) system for all of your Visual Studio projects, and hopefully start to appreciate why Git has become such a huge success.

For those not so familiar with Git it’s a free and open-source¬†Distributed Version Control System (DVCS) developed back in 2005 by a very famous developer in the software world named¬†Linus Torvalds. It’s considered “the SCM” of choice in many circles and for good reason. It’s fast, simple, distributed, can support projects of any size and a variety of workflows. If you want to read more visit the Git Book website – it’s a free online resource for learning about Git. Continue reading